Jewelry Shows

Touring the Winter Antiques Show 2015

WAS 2015

A grand installation of velvety red roses cast a warm crimson spell at the entrance to this year’s Winter Antiques Show at the Park Avenue Armory. In its 61st year, the annual fair upholds its reputation as the most prestigious antiques show in the U.S. A total of 73 exhibitors offer well-heeled collectors, as well as scholarly ‘window-shoppers’, an impressive array of rare objects, all heavily vetted, to add to their collections. The show, which opened on Friday, runs until February 1st, and both the opening night and first day of the fair drew crowds dressed to the nines and glittering with jewels.

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Compared to the other antiques shows held at the Armory, jewelry does not dominate – the seven jewelry exhibitors seamlessly intermix with the gamut of rarities that range from stunning Persian rugs and Sèvres porcelain to first-edition books and Hudson River School paintings.

The jewelry exhibitors at the show are among the top purveyors of the rare and one-of-a-kind jeweled masterpieces in the world. I spent some time gleaning their cases for new and interesting pieces, or jewels I had not yet seen in person. Beginning at the booth of A La Vieille Russie, I was treated to an incredibly rare ring by Fabergé. According to Mr. Peter Schaeffer, who runs the New York firm alongside his brother Paul and nephew Mark, very few rings were produced by Fabergé – maybe just a handful. The one on display at their booth is of a truly delicate nature, comprised of a small, smooth cone-like cabochon sapphire at the center with an elegantly thin band with minute diamond accents.

A Cabochon Sapphire and Diamond Ring, by Fabergé at A La Vieille Russie

A Cabochon Sapphire and Diamond Ring, by Fabergé at A La Vieille Russie

In one of the tower cases, there were two other notable works by Fabergé:

A gold, diamond and enamel presentation box

A gold, diamond and enamel presentation box

Gold panagia and chain, set with sapphires, diamonds and pearls, and with a cloisonné enamel medallion of Christ Pantocrator based on one of the 11th-century formerly decorating an icon of the Archangle Gabriel in the Djumati Monsatery in Georgia, and now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. - By Fabergé, St. Petersburg, late 19th century

Gold panagia and chain, set with sapphires, diamonds and pearls, and with a cloisonné enamel medallion of Christ Pantocrator based on one of the 11th-century formerly decorating an icon of the Archangle Gabriel in the Djumati Monsatery in Georgia, and now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. – By Fabergé, St. Petersburg, late 19th century

 

Always a favorite with both art and jewelry collectors alike, Didier Ltd. was very much a-buzz with guests admiring the collection of  jewelry by post-war painters and sculptors, including works by Alexander Calder,  Georges Braque, Salvador Dalí, Claude Lalanne, Pablo Picasso and Man Ray.

Various jewels by Niki de Saint Phalle, 1970s, at Didier Ltd. London

Various jewels by Niki de Saint Phalle, 1970s, at Didier Ltd. London

 

At New York-based estate jewelry dealer Kentshire, a colorful brooch by Flato caught my eye:

A diamond and multi-colored gem-set brooch, by Flato

A diamond and multi-colored gem-set brooch, by Flato

 

Another shop based in New York, Macklowe Gallery wowed with its magnificent Tiffany lamps and dazzling jewels. My favorite was this glamorous ruby and diamond necklace formerly in the collection of Lucie Bigelow Rosen. With a shared passion for art and music, Rosen along with her husband Walter opened the renowned Caramoor Center for Music and the Arts in Katonah, New York, in 1946.

Lucie Bigelow Rosen's Ruby & Diamond Necklace, French, retailed by Dreicer & Co., circa 1910.

Lucie Bigelow Rosen’s Ruby & Diamond Necklace, French, retailed by Dreicer & Co., circa 1910.

Just underneath the necklace in the above photo is a beautiful Art Nouveau “Two Peacocks” pendants by René Lalique:

René Lalique Gold & Enamel "Two Peacocks" Pendant, circa 1897-1898.

René Lalique Gold & Enamel “Two Peacocks” Pendant, circa 1897-1898.

 

This gold double eagle bangle by Paul Robin was a favorite from fine antique jewelry and silver dealer James Robinson:

Napoleon III period 18k gold, double eagle bangle with pearls and ruby eyes, Paul Robin, France, circa 1860. (Photo courtesy of James Robinson)

Napoleon III period 18k gold, double eagle bangle with pearls and ruby eyes, Paul Robin, France, circa 1860. (Photo courtesy of James Robinson)

 

Two stunning rings caught my eye over at S.J. Shrubsole, another New York antique jewelry and silver dealer:

An Antique Diamond Ring, by Tiffany & Co., circa 1900. Set with a cushion-cut diamond at center within radiating lines of blue enamel and diamonds. (Photo courtesy of S.J. Shrubsole)

An Antique Diamond Ring, by Tiffany & Co., circa 1900. Set with a cushion-cut diamond at center within radiating lines of blue enamel and diamonds. (Photo courtesy of S.J. Shrubsole)

A French Estate 18K Gold & Chrysoprase Ring, by Cartier, circa 1965. The ring is likely and early design by Dinh Van, who designed for Cartier in the 1960s. (Photo courtesy of S.J. Shrubsole)

A French Estate 18K Gold & Chrysoprase Ring, by Cartier, circa 1965. The ring is likely and early design by Dinh Van, who designed for Cartier in the 1960s. (Photo courtesy of S.J. Shrubsole)

 

Last but not least, Wartski delighted with several wonderful new pieces as well as fabulous Fabergé. One of the main highlights on display at the London dealer’s booth, and perhaps in the entire show, is a stunning late Art Deco aquamarine and diamond necklace the female designer Olga Tritt. A New York based jeweler, Tritt specialized in antique jewelry as well as pieces of her own design. Interestingly, the Duchess of Windsor was one of Tritt’s most famous customers.

An Impressive Art Deco Aquamarine & Diamond Necklace, by Olga Tritt, New York, circa 1939

An Impressive Art Deco Aquamarine & Diamond Necklace, by Olga Tritt, New York, circa 1939

I must have had Flato on my mind as another one of the designer’s pieces caught my attention. I had been wanting to see this diamond flower bracelet for some time, and it was well worth the wait. The graceful sculptural quality and impressive dimensionality of the bracelet was breathtaking.

A Platinum & Diamond Rose Bracelet, by Paul Flato, circa 1935.

A Platinum & Diamond Rose Bracelet, by Paul Flato, circa 1935.

Lastly, a colorful Art Nouveau corsage ornament drew me closer like a moth to a flame. More on this Fouquet-made, Mucha-designed jewel tomorrow…

A gold and enamelled corsage ornament by Georges Fouquet in the Byzantine taste, the center miniature and design by Alphonse Mucha. Paris, circa 1900

A gold and enamelled corsage ornament by Georges Fouquet in the Byzantine taste, the center miniature and design by Alphonse Mucha. Paris, circa 1900

 

Outside of the jewelry, there are countless antiques and artworks definitely worth seeing in addition to the jewels, some of them are even by jewelers themselves! Below are just a few!

"North African Town", Louis Comfort Tiffany, circa Last Quart, 19th Century, New York. - Casein on hand-woven canvas. At Associated Artists

“North African Town”, Louis Comfort Tiffany, circa Last Quart, 19th Century, New York. – Casein on hand-woven canvas. At Associated Artists

One of a Pair of Painted & Gilt-Flecked " Pompeiian" Side Chairs. Herter Brothers, New York, circa 1880. Provenance:  J.P. Morgan. At Associated Artists

One of a Pair of Painted & Gilt-Flecked ” Pompeiian” Side Chairs. Herter Brothers, New York, circa 1880. Provenance: J.P. Morgan. At Associated Artists

A German replica of Noah's art, from around 1850. At Allan Katz

A German replica of Noah’s ark, from around 1850. At Allan Katz

Part of a "Viking" coffee set by Paulding Farnham for Tiffany & Co., circa 1901. From the Newark Museum

Part of a “Viking” coffee set by Paulding Farnham for Tiffany & Co., circa 1901. From the Newark Museum

The Winter Antiques Show runs through February 1st at the Park Avenue Armory, Park Avenue at 67th Street; winterantiquesshow.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 Comments

  • Reply
    Ann
    January 26, 2015 at 12:23 am

    That should probably be “Noah’s ark” rather than “Noah’s art.” Not that it isn’t both.

  • Reply
    Georgia Donaldson
    January 26, 2015 at 9:47 am

    Thank you! I love having a peak of the WAS. Wish I could get to NYC to see it in person.

  • Reply
    Bernard Cohen
    January 26, 2015 at 10:07 am

    Wonderful report!!!

  • Leave a Reply